National WA Business Excellence Award – While Working From The Hallway

National WA Business Excellence Award – While Working From The Hallway

Do you know what? I suck at PR.

I suck so hard at it I don’t even do it for myself. This press release below? It’s a hurriedly updated version of a great one I got back from a dear friend (and past copy student) Anna, from CreativeIQ, when I became an AusMumpreneur 2018 finalist.

I wasn’t even going to go attend the AusMumpreneur Awards.

It was the third year I’d been nominated and the third year I thought, “I don’t really…fit”. I wasn’t a million dollar business. I didn’t have staff. I’d only just started to dig us out of living just above the poverty line. And I wasn’t sure I was a Mumpreneur, a decent Mum some days, or an entrepreneur at all. And it was in Melbourne. And what would I wear? And who would I talk to? And TWO DAYS of conference?! Could my raging introvert cope?

And all those other reasons I’m sure you’ve told yourself you shouldn’t try for something too.  

But then my husband said to me, “If this is a financial decision, think of it like this: if you go, and pick up just one client, that’s your airfare and accommodation paid for.”

I thought, “Hmmmmm”.

Then my business mate said, “If you’ve been nominated three years in a row, your people obviously want you to go, perhaps you should respect that”.

I thought, “Hmmmmmmm”.

My daughter said, “I reckon you could win that, Mum”.

I thought, “What if I could?”

So, I entered and am off to Melbourne to pitch to a panel of judges and answer their questions with (hopefully) statements that are carefully considered and make some semblance of sense. Thanks to my team, I have a fully functioning press release that I’ll share with you below.

*****

Parkerville Mother of 3, Jay Crisp Crow, has just been named AusMumpreneur Of The Year in the WA Business Excellence category.

Jay started Crisp Copy from her dining room table just 3 years ago whilst working at a local private school. With no business background, but believing she was capable of creating something tailored to her family and abilities, Jay devised a five-year plan to build a business that could generate enough income to allow her to leave her school hours job. Within 2 years, business had sky-rocketed and she took the leap early and left her safe (but limited) job and officially became a business owner.

Jay somewhat surprised herself by becoming a multi award-winning copywriter, editor, and copy coach working with brands and businesses around the globe. Building an incredible career based on the art of writing words that sell, Jay has turned her love of stories and people into something she never thought possible – a sustainable, thriving business. She regularly teaches, presents, and speaks in Perth and online on everything copy and words.

After receiving word she was a finalist in her category, Jay travelled to Melbourne to pitch to 3 independent judges against a range of diverse businesses in the WA Business Excellence category.

Judge Karen McDermott, owner of Serenity Press, said the decision to award Jay as the winner of the award was unanimous,

“Jay stood out as a clear winner because not only is she a high achieving businesswoman who has built a strong brand profile, she also has a very powerful story that will inspire many fellow mums in business.”

Jay said, “Business is not easy and Crisp Copy has not always been a smooth ride – I’ve battled with the juggle of business and family, copycats, and creating a business structure around a long-term chronic illness. But overcoming these challenges have allowed me to embrace opportunities and experience greater success.”

Aside from delivering brilliant results for clients and creating a consistent income stream, one of Jay’s greatest successes has come from recognising the opportunity to leverage her natural skills as a teacher and sharing her knowledge and experience with other copywriters and business owners to allow them to elevate the quality of their own communications.

After all, the world needs more delicious words.

The AusMumpreneur Awards, presented by The AusMumpreneur Network, celebrate and recognise Australian mums in business achieving outstanding success in areas such as business excellence, product development, customer service and digital innovation. The awards are designed to recognise the growing number of women who successfully balance motherhood and business in a way that suits their life and family.

Peace Mitchell, co-founder of AusMumpreneur said, “These awards are all about recognising the growing number of mums who are achieving outstanding business success while balancing motherhood.”

“We are delighted that Jay has won this award, she has created an outstanding business and is an inspirational role model and ambassador for mums in business everywhere. We wish her and all our amazing Ausmumpreneur Award winners every success in the coming year,” Peace said.

AusMumpreneur Network co-founder Katy Garner said, “The number of women starting businesses has continued to grow in the last 12 months. Of the 668,670 women operating a small business in Australia currently, a total of 47 per cent are mums with children at home.  We are thrilled to be the number one community for mumpreneurs and proud to showcase the best and the brightest each year through these awards.”

It can be challenging to run a successful business whilst raising a family and Jay gives this advice for others thinking about starting their own enterprise,

“Know your values (and your family’s values) and stick to them like honey sticks to toast. Always, always check in with yourself and whether what you’re doing aligns with them – when there’s a mismatch, that’s when you can end up in the wrong place. You need to be ready to pivot when things aren’t working and try something different.”

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Jay Crisp Crow

Yep, really my name

If you’re here for the intuitive mix of done-for-you, make-you-cry copy or you want to learn all my secrets so you can DIY like a pro; sister, you’re in the right place. I’m a copywriter, editor, and copy consultant and coach for businesswomen ready to move away from the boring as bat poop churning out of content. Words that sound the same as everyone else’s. Bah humbug! I am terrible at writing my own blogs but smashing at writing for clients. I live in the Hills of Perth, WA, and work with women around the world through the technologically spiffy powers of t’internet. Yay for that!

I’m Not Sure I’m A Mumpreneur

I’m Not Sure I’m A Mumpreneur

Not a mompreneur either.

Not a blondepreneur, or femmepreneur, or even a bedpreneur.

In fact, I’m not even an entrepreneur,

in the pure sense of the term. But I am a business owner. A creative in business. And a mother.

(And a wife, a Musical Theatre nut, a Caesar Salad connoisseur, and a shiz-hot tap dancer.)

So, why do the media seem to love this term? This bundle of a label that perhaps takes the shine off what women in business who are also mothers do? Every time I’m in the paper I get a ‘mumpreneur’ thrown in for free. Does it belittle what I do? Does it mean I am a mother first and foremost and my purpose in life is raising children and my secondary objective is building a business?

When we live in a world where words matter so much, isn’t it time we took stock of the labels we allow?

Now, I fully respect the parents in business who embrace the term. Like taking your husband’s name, like joint bank accounts – I believe it’s a personal choice. Be an anythingyoulikepreneur if it tickles your fancy. And I think it’s been created with the best of intentions – like #girlboss – it means to shine a light on the brilliance of women who are managing two very distinct and important roles at one time.

But, I wonder if it does us a disservice.

(OK, and yes, when I read it it makes me throw up in my own mouth a bit.)

A little like ‘female author’

why are we not just ‘authors’ or ‘business owners’ or even plain old hot-as-heck entrepreneurs?

Does it put a less-than symbol in front of our enterprise? I think maybe it does.

The term-defenders question; “Don’t I think the experience of being a parent might make me a better business-woman?”

I think so. Do I know for sure? No, because I’ve been a Mum for 18 years and a small business owner for three and I’ve never performed the two roles separately.

In addition, all the experiences I’ve had in my life have also contributed to running a successful business; from years of Musical Theatre study to travelling the world and managing an illness. Maybe I should be a ‘disabilpreneur’? 

If I am a young woman without children am I a ‘girlpreneur’? If I do the writing well and the businessing acceptably should I be a ‘writerpreneur’? ‘Penpreneur’? ‘Storypreneur’?

As one of the women in my Crisp Copy Club asked; “Should I be a nannapreneur?”

Why the distinction?

I have authority and experience and expertise. It has a bit to do with raising (dragging up, some days) children. But, it probably has more to do with being a life-long writer with an excessive supply of empathy. It also has to do with being a wife, and a daughter of a very smart woman, and a friend of other clever women, and a student, and a traveller, and a thinker, and a doer, and a lover, and and and…

I am an awesome mother and a flying-by-the-seat-of-my-pants business owner and a wicked copywriter.

But all that adds up to ‘Writer with a Business’ to me.

I might rethink it when Richard Branson starts getting called a ‘dudepreneur’, or Channing Tatum gets labelled a ‘dadctor’, and people stop bleeding asking the Prime Minister of New Zealand if she feels guilty about taking maternity leave.

I don’t mind being labelled it in the media. I mean – positive PR – what’s not to love, lovers? I’ll admit; in every single release, it’s been mentioned in a positive way – a celebration of women and mothers and kicking butt in business. But I’m also willing to have a conversation about it. Not in a way that belittles mothers and every damn good thing they do. But in a way that equates the success of women in business with their own, personal accomplishments – beyond their ability to purposefully use their reproductive systems and then take care of their youngens.

Sometimes I worry it sets me apart from my divinely talented female business owning friends. The ones without babies. Does it make those of us who have made use of our wombs a bit insular? Does it make our enterprising women friends feel excluded? The women I’ve asked seem to intimate yes.

And that makes me like it even less.

If you want to be a mumpreneur, I will support you. One thousand, gazbillion percent. If you want me to call you Mrs Twiddle Pants of the Twenty First Century over emails, look, I’ll do that too.

And while I continue to choose to be unemployable and utilise my skills in branding and business and writing to create a life that imperfectly blends (not balances – because I believe that’s all a bit of BS) all the good stuff I have going on,

I know that you’ll be OK with me not being one.

 

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Jay Crisp Crow

Yep, really my name

If you’re here for the intuitive mix of done-for-you, make-you-cry copy or you want to learn all my secrets so you can DIY like a pro; sister, you’re in the right place. I’m a copywriter, editor, and copy consultant and coach for businesswomen ready to move away from the boring as bat poop churning out of content. Words that sound the same as everyone else’s. Bah humbug! I am terrible at writing my own blogs but smashing at writing for clients. I live in the Hills of Perth, WA, and work with women around the world through the technologically spiffy powers of t’internet. Yay for that!

Position Yourself As The Main Event, Not One Of The Chorus Line

Position Yourself As The Main Event, Not One Of The Chorus Line

So, I think at this point of the day we should play a drinking game.

Stick with me here.

Let’s all go to a random website. Ohhhh now, how about we try our own? And every time we read something like this:

Hi, I’m Lucy/Willow/Betsy

I’m a passionate yoga teacher/dog walker/coach working with women who want to reduce the overwhelm/ignite their inner light/so they can thrive/be inspired. 

I am genuine and authentic and original…

We take a shot.

How long before you think we’d be incapacitated? I estimate about 20 minutes, tops.

(Also, genuine and authentic mean the same damn thing, person I stole this copy from, and both are boring as bat poop.)

You know what?

There’s nothing actually wrong with any of these concepts.

Not fundamentally. And these good people, they mean them! They have businesses that are important to them, brands they’ve spent years and thousands developing, they have a gift and want to share it with the world.

The problem is sharing them with the world requires them to be on the internet.

And the internet is a noisy place.

And a LOT of people are singing exactly the same damn song.

Sounding exactly the same as your competitor gives you zero edge.

Find your own brand voice. Don’t be an echo of someone else’s. Because being in the chorus line has only ever paid peanuts. You want your brand to be front and centre stage with the big spotlight on you making the big noise and the bigger dollars.

#nomorechorusline

#nomoresafecopy

 

Have no idea how to start developing a brand voice? Click here and download a ten-minute exercise to build a foundational Word Bank – the first step to branded messaging brilliance.

Jay-crisp-crow-crisp-copy-signature

Jay Crisp Crow

Yep, really my name

If you’re here for the intuitive mix of done-for-you, make-you-cry copy or you want to learn all my secrets so you can DIY like a pro; sister, you’re in the right place. I’m a copywriter, editor, and copy consultant and coach for businesswomen ready to move away from the boring as bat poop churning out of content. Words that sound the same as everyone else’s. Bah humbug! I am terrible at writing my own blogs but smashing at writing for clients. I live in the Hills of Perth, WA, and work with women around the world through the technologically spiffy powers of t’internet. Yay for that!

5 Tips on Public Speaking for Scaredy Cats

5 Tips on Public Speaking for Scaredy Cats

When I originally launched Crisp Copy, I couldn’t imagine public speaking would become part of my business journey.

The idea of speaking publicly, either in front of real, live humans or on the air, made my heart palpitate and mind race.

And here’s the odd thing: with a background and training from one of Australia’s premier Drama and Music institutions and  a life time spent on stage (I started dancing at 2 and my first job was of professional cheerleader) I should have been completely confident.

However, to put yourself in the vulnerable position of public speaking is simply a different, more nerve wracking experience than communicating through words, or indeed, as it seems, song.

When I was asked to speak at my first event, I thought perhaps it would be a one off. It was a trial by fire – a full day of MCing to a hall full of clever people, complete with making up jokes and telling anecdotes about my kids and my job when the day’s schedule was held up.

Shortly after, I realised I had enough clients wanting to work with me one on one with digital communications training to put them all in a room together, do it all in one shot, and save them each a couple of hundred dollars.

From there, workshops were booked out, I received more invitations to speak, and I soon had to get used to the idea that this is how my clients wanted to meet me – in person. Teaching them something.

I’ve learned some tips on public speaking from not only stumbling through my own presentations but also from some highly effective public speakers I’ve met on the circuit.

I hope my tips will help you relax and prepare for the next time you tackle this formidable task.

5 Top Tips to Public Speaking Success (for introverted, scared little copywriters and other chickens).

  1. Feel honoured.

Someone thinks you have something to say, and they are giving you the opportunity to make your voice heard.

When you add the feeling of sincere gratitude into the mix, the sheer anxiety dissipates a bit. If others have faith in your ability, you should give it a shot.

  1. Be flexible.

Don’t over structure everything you’re planning to say.

A structured speech can help you stay organised, but might feel unnatural for your audience if it is too rigid. With some flexibility, you can modify your speech as you go along.

Understand the content of your speech, and keep some things to say in mind, but don’t worry so much about where and when you will say them… they will flow out when the right moment presents itself.

Having some flexibility also takes into consideration that not all audiences are created equal. Be prepared to morph your presentation or speech in line with your audience response.

  1. Get jazz hands.

Use your hands! It makes your audience feel more at ease, and you seem more personable. We’re human, after all, and we already communicate so much with body language.

So shake out those nerves and keep yourself moving. And more importantly, remember to take a deep breath before you begin.

There are some absolutely rivetingly fascinating TED talks about body language. Watch them and practice as you go.

  1. Be enamoured.

Talk about something you love.

When you talk about something you’re crazy about, you’ve already prepared most of your speech.

In my podcasts and workshops, where I talk about Crisp Crow Communications and all that entails successful copywriting, I’m really talking about my love for writing. Passion and purpose are the perfect sources to begin a discussion. Plus, an audience wants to know who is speaking to them, and what better way to get to know a person by hearing them talk about something they love?

  1. Give value.

Impart some wisdom to the audience that they can use to implement change that very day.

You want your audience to go home having learned something they can practice in their personal or business lives right away.

While these are just a few tips on public speaking, it’s important to challenge the fear of putting yourself out there because that ultimately paves the way for something extraordinary.

When people come up to tell me how I helped change their lives, or when they send emails about how touched they were by something I said, it makes all that fear and gruelling anticipation worth it.

When I make connections after speaking, it reminds me how tangible my lesson is. Different people learn in different ways, so if we scrap the idea of giving a speech or presentation forever, we’re missing out on all that interaction with people who don’t learn by reading.
We’re all human, and we all have fears, but public speaking doesn’t have to be one of them.jaycrispcrowsignature2

Being asked to participate in these podcasts and workshops was all a real threat to my comfort zone, but as I always say: no one gets into small business to feel comfy.

Have questions? Want to know if I drank before hand? Shoot me a message below.

 

Jay-crisp-crow-crisp-copy-signature

Jay Crisp Crow

Yep, really my name

If you’re here for the intuitive mix of done-for-you, make-you-cry copy or you want to learn all my secrets so you can DIY like a pro; sister, you’re in the right place. I’m a copywriter, editor, and copy consultant and coach for businesswomen ready to move away from the boring as bat poop churning out of content. Words that sound the same as everyone else’s. Bah humbug! I am terrible at writing my own blogs but smashing at writing for clients. I live in the Hills of Perth, WA, and work with women around the world through the technologically spiffy powers of t’internet. Yay for that!

How Not To Use Your Facebook Friends for Networking

How Not To Use Your Facebook Friends for Networking

I was surprised when I started my business how many people just LOVED me at networking events.

I mean, I’d go to these things, meet someone for less than ten minutes, swap cards and voila!

They wanted to be my friend on Facebook.

I must be likeable, right?

It took me a while to figure out that I was just one in a massive collection of ‘friends’ who these kinds of networkers use as a selling tool. I’d been collected, stored on a list and not even wished a Happy Birthday, for goodness sake.

I started to realise when someone I thought I might like failed to speak to me for the months after she friend requested me, then tried to use the comments on some photo of my kid to sell tickets to her upcoming event.

Holllld UP! If you’re not here for the cute photos of my red-head tornado toddler, and you don’t really care about how my business is going or what I’m having for dinner, what exactly is it you’re doing on my list?

I don’t know where these folk went to networking school. Perhaps someone taught them that this is how you do it.

I don’t think it is.

Facebook is an awesome tool.

Like, really, I am 100% a Facebook Freak of a Fan. I turned my Facebook addiction into the second arm of my business, that’s how much I love it. (And, I have to admit, I am not on it any more than I was before my business… scary).

However, just because it works in a way that you can tag 35 people in your post about your new product and it appears on their feed, finding its way into all their friends feeds too, doesn’t mean you should.

If you know someone is totally going to be into your thing and being tagged in it’s going to be thrilling for them, knock yourself out. Equally, if you happen to meet someone at an event, or, perhaps, like I did, online and you liked their blog and got chatting to them on a forum and the way they parent aligned with yours so you friend requested them (OK, NOW it sounds totally naff), that alright too, I think. I hope…

Facebook, and indeed all social media, is the platform to begin a conversation. Start a new relationship. If you’re a “user”, as we called folk like this back in High School, then I don’t really want a relationship with you thanks. I already have children.

Facebook, and indeed all social media, is the platform to begin a conversation. Click To Tweet

At a recent Personal Branding workshop run by the knowledgeable and ethical Queen of Manners, Sharron Attwood, I asked her the correct way to handle this kind of conundrum. I trusted she would help me manage the situation elegantly, being the epitome of ‘doing things properly’. I wasn’t sure which fork to use first, and if I should leave these ‘serial networkers’ on my restricted list (where they all got shuffled) or delete them altogether. I was tending to move away from the delete option, given I’d ‘cleaned up’ my list while pregnant and fragile and frightfully offended a mum at footy. (She hailed from the same spot as my husband’s ex-wife, I just wasn’t risking it. She’s still not talking to me to this day).

Here’s the advice Sharron gave me:

Check the person before accepting.

Have they friend requested 1500 people at the same time as you? Are they suddenly friends with about 40 mutual friends? If so, they’re probably ‘friend’ hunting; popping from one list to another to get access to people’s lists. If you’re not sure, just leave them there for a while and see what you think.

Have a ‘Facebook Follow’ button.

Giving new networking friends this option means that they can keep up with the posts you make public without necessarily needing to be on your friends list.

If you’re like me and you use your personal Facebook profile to have silly conversations with your girlfriends, find out world news, post photos of your kids being adorable (filtered, of course, through Instagram and with no mention of the grief they’ve caused all week), or photos of cake, these new professional friends probably won’t find much of any interest in your account. Giving them the option to follow the public version of you might just be a better idea – it was for me.

Here’s another idea that I utilised with those people I did really want to connect with but not through my personal page:

Be honest.

I sent a few simple messages saying that my personal page was just for friends and family but I’d like to follow their business page if they wanted to message it through and here was mine. No one got offended, no one refused to serve me coffee at the kids’ football, and the outcome remained the same – business people connecting through a channel made for it.

Now, there really are totally open and lovely folk out there with 2000 Facebook friends. They do business with them, they connect and chat, and they artfully meld a business and personal page together with just the right amount of blend. I’m not picking on anyone with a hefty Facebook friends list, by any means.

Whether you have 90 friends or 2500 friends, the guiding principles remain the same:

Have good manners. Deal with people the best way you can (not by deleting them at 4am in a hormone induced, fright fuelled panic.) Don’t use their page to promote your stuff, unless they’re AOK with it. Say Happy Birthday. If you get it wrong, apologise. We can’t all be Sharron, that’s why she runs workshops. We might get it wrong sometimes.

Remember, this is a relationship. Be your best.

“Manners are a sensitive awareness of the feelings of others. If you have that awareness, you have good manners, no matter what fork you use.” – Emily Post, Author

Jay-crisp-crow-crisp-copy-signature

Jay Crisp Crow

Yep, really my name

If you’re here for the intuitive mix of done-for-you, make-you-cry copy or you want to learn all my secrets so you can DIY like a pro; sister, you’re in the right place. I’m a copywriter, editor, and copy consultant and coach for businesswomen ready to move away from the boring as bat poop churning out of content. Words that sound the same as everyone else’s. Bah humbug! I am terrible at writing my own blogs but smashing at writing for clients. I live in the Hills of Perth, WA, and work with women around the world through the technologically spiffy powers of t’internet. Yay for that!

Why Get Social In Business?

Why Get Social In Business?

I often indulge in a little internal chuckle when I get a message or phone call that begins with “I stumbled across your business page in my Facebook feed…”

Nope, you didn’t stumble. This was no accident. I put myself there. Right in your path.

I often hear business owners saying “I don’t like social media. I don’t see the point in putting any energy into it”. That’s a little bit like saying “I don’t like preparing for my tax return. I just don’t see the investment”. Nowadays, to run a sustainable business, there’s not much choice in participating in either!

Whether you’re selling a product or a service, if you’re building new business relationships or planning on boosting sales, even regardless of whether you have a business website or not, you’re eighty gazbillion percent (not a real number) missing out if you’re not developing your business through social media.

As consumers, we are increasingly discerning. We know we can buy product at the click of a button and perhaps pay a little less. If we decide this isn’t the way we want to go, we are looking for a relationship with the person we’re buying from. We like to search for you instead of being tracked down and we like to gauge who you are as a business person more than being sold to. Most of the time, we’ve inspected you online and pretty much made up our mind about your business before we’ve even clicked to buy, come into your store front, or sent you an email.

So, make it easy for us to get to know you.

Make it simple for us to get our hands on your content.

Give us lots of different places to check you out.

Now, here’s where if I am doing a workshop I like to throw in all kinds of stunning numbers. I’m not really a numbers girl, my accountant would wearily testify to this fact, but the kind of numbers that make you feel motivated to get social and get in the action are downright exciting. Google Social Media Statistics 2015 and prepare to be encouraged.

When I start with a new client, I like to go on a mystery hunt for their ideal customer. This is less like stalking, and more along the lines of who the customer is as a person, how they spend and, here’s the important part, where they ‘live’ online. I can tell you, many of us consumers ‘live’ on Facebook.

Nearly 80% of us are on Facebook regularly. Some of us every day. Many of us shop while we’re on Facebook. If you’re thinking, “I’ve never bought something from Facebook”, consider the links you’ve clicked that have taken you to a website OR the amount of times you’ve thought about needing a plumber, hopped onto Facebook, and asked for a recommendation. Around 90% of all businesses that are on Facebook right now are reporting sales from their business page.

One of the top questions I get asked at digital communication workshops is “Do I REALLY have to be EVERYWHERE?”

The answer isn’t too terrible. Yes, it would be nice if you were. Have a Facebook page, an Instagram business account, a LinkedIn profile, a Twitter account if you’d like. Pinterest is also an amazing, growing platform, especially if you deal with wellness and food, and if you’re selling to men, they tend to be on Google +. But don’t spend too much time on all of them. Figure out where your ideal clients will be most likely to find you and do most of your engaging there. The other social places can be a little quieter.

Think of your regular social media places like your favourite café; the best spot to meet someone and have a chat.

Once you’re set up, learn to schedule your Facebook posts so you’re limiting your Facebook Time Vacuum to just an hour a week. Spend less than 10 minutes a day on Instagram. Be on LinkedIn, so that customers can see you are who you say you are.

This kind of relationship building lets your potential loyal customers figure out if your business practices and ethics align with what they’re looking for. They begin to feel like they’re connected to you and, as a bonus, the filters on Instagram make everyone look good.

If you have a website, ensure when you start getting socially active you link all your social media sites to your site. This makes it easier for your new client to get around all your favourite haunts and increases the search engine optimisation (SEO) of your page.

I have a particular soft spot for start up’s and ‘ma and pa’ small business. I completely relate, being an ‘un-funded’ small business owner. My business feeds my family and pays my bills. It’s not a hobby.

So, I totally understand that the world of social media for business purposes can be both overwhelming and exhausting. Especially if you’re considering much of it is usually done at the end of a long day running your actual business.

I’m not advocating you spending hours and days and weeks on social media for a good return on your investment. I’m asking you to consider looking at social media as a really great platform to put deliver your business.

Right in the path of your most ideal client.

So they ‘stumble’ across you.

This piece originally appeared in the Swan Magazine and has been reprinted with permission of the Editor.

Jay-crisp-crow-crisp-copy-signature

Jay Crisp Crow

Yep, really my name

If you’re here for the intuitive mix of done-for-you, make-you-cry copy or you want to learn all my secrets so you can DIY like a pro; sister, you’re in the right place. I’m a copywriter, editor, and copy consultant and coach for businesswomen ready to move away from the boring as bat poop churning out of content. Words that sound the same as everyone else’s. Bah humbug! I am terrible at writing my own blogs but smashing at writing for clients. I live in the Hills of Perth, WA, and work with women around the world through the technologically spiffy powers of t’internet. Yay for that!